Search Results for: MORGAN

Free Morgan

The last orca who needs rescuing is, of course, Morgan. I have mentioned her story in my very first article, so click ->here<- if you want to read it. Morgan is a lone female orca who was rescued in the Wadden Sea, off to the northwest coast of the Netherlands in June 2010. She was found in very poor health (weighing approximately 950 pounds and likely being dehydrated – she was 11.5 feet long) and was therefore rescued and administrated medical…

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Fight for Morgan’s Freedom Will Continue

My first article to start this blog will about the latest news of the moment: Free Morgan. For those who do not completely know Morgan’s story, I found these illustrations (see at the bottom of the article) on the Free Morgan Foundation website explaining her situation. The court has revealed its verdict yesterday on December the 13th at the Amsterdam Court.  And the result is, no, Morgan will not be set free. She is going to live a life of captivity…

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Ingrid Visser

Ingrid Visser is marine biologist known for studying orcas. Born in Wellington, New Zealand, Ingrid Visser holds three University Degrees: Bachelor of Science (Massey University), Masters of Science (Auckland University) and Doctorate of Philosophy (Auckland University). She has been studying orcas since 1992 and completed her PhD in 2000, on the first ever scientific study of orca in New Zealand waters. Her research has been published in international scientific journals, since 1998, and many of these publications are available on…

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Winter 2018

Morgan is a mom Let’s go back to Morgan, an orca who was rescued and healed in 2010. She was found in poor health in the waters of Netherlands. Once healthy again, she was transferred to Loro Parque instead of being released to the sea. Below is a timeline of Morgan’s pregnancy created by the Free Morgan Foundation. It clearly states that Loro Parque kept Morgan’s pregnancy a secret until it was officially issued she would not be released to…

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Fall 2018

Three deaths among the Southern resident population It all started when J-35, a member of the Southern Resident population, lost her baby short after the birth, on July 24th, near Victoria (BC). As a sign of mourning, she carries the body of her baby. Although this type of behaviour has been observed before, it has never lasted that long: J-35 carried the body longer than 17 days.Undeniable proof that animals are capable of love. There hasn’t been a succesful birth…

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