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Author: Keep Whales Wild, Cétacés Libres

RIP Freya

RIP Freya

Sad news in the world of captivity, Freya, the oldest orca in Marineland France, passed away today. According to the park, the orca had been ill for some time (but let’s all be reassured, apparently, she did not suffer thanks to all the care from the veterinary team) and an autopsy will be carried out to figure out the causes of death. Let’s hope the results of that autopsy will be published. A little background story: Freya was born in…

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News

News

First of all, let me apologise for not writing in this blog as often as I used to. I will therefore try to do an article that sums up most of the latest news: Alright, so since the beginning of the year: The albino dolphin, Angel is still being held captive at Taiji Museum. Angel is the first dolphin to spark a lawsuit for dolphins against the government of Taiji. On Angel’s side will be Ric O’Barry’s organizations (Dolphin Project…

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Mass capture in Taiji

Mass capture in Taiji

On January 17th, 4 pods of dolphins were captured by Taiji fishermen. That’s about 250 dolphins including a baby albino. The following day, 25 dolphins were selected to a life of captivity (including the baby albino named Angel by Ric O’Barry) Today January 19th, 15 more dolphins were taken captive and we learn that Angel was taken straight to Taiji Whale Museum. That’s 40 dolphins in two days… The remaining 200 await their fate until tomorrow morning. CNN even covered…

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Birth at Marineland – France

Birth at Marineland – France

 ____ Yesterday, Tuesday 10th of December, Marineland (France) finally made an official announcement of a new orca calf. (Let’s remind ourselves that the baby was born on November the 20th). The mother, Wikie, has already given birth to a male orca, Moana, in March 2011, via AI, thanks to Ulises’ sperm (a male orca from the group SeaWorld – where a trainer was recently killed by an orca attack). At first, the staff thought Moana was a female, hence the…

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To sum up

To sum up

It’s been a while since I last wrote a post in this blog. A recent publication in Freedom for Whales’ Instagram account prompted me to share it, so here it goes: ” What a lot of people don’t realize about cetacean captivity is that once the show is over, you get to leave. You get to go explore the rest of the oceanarium, you get to leave and decide what you’d like for dinner. You get to go see your…

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A pregnant orca at Marineland, France?

A pregnant orca at Marineland, France?

From the looks of recent photos, Wikie,the youngest female at Marineland France is pregnant-again. Why is this concerning? Her baby, Moana, is merely 2 years old. He still needs almost constant attention from his mother at such a young age, and now that she will soon have another baby, he will not receive all the vital attention he needs. Wikie is 11 years old. She has not reached the age in which wild orca females begin breeding, yet she is…

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Updates

Updates

Since the creation of this blog, I’ve focused on sharing international facts about captivity. I’ve tried to write about every important subject (captures, Taiji, breeding programmes, trial, etc.) But, I wanted to create this blog to study more seriously the French marine parks. The recent death of the dolphin named Ecume (in English, Sea Foam) at Marineland, Antibes, seemed to me the perfect occasion to get going on that subject. [Foam died on February 26th, after 28 years at Marineland….

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Free Morgan

Free Morgan

The last orca who needs rescuing is, of course, Morgan. I have mentioned her story in my very first article, so click ->here<- if you want to read it. Morgan is a lone female orca who was rescued in the Wadden Sea, off to the northwest coast of the Netherlands in June 2010. She was found in very poor health (weighing approximately 950 pounds and likely being dehydrated – she was 11.5 feet long) and was therefore rescued and administrated medical…

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